postcards

Here it is. One month to the day. Kit’s and my perspective. Please see websites to see full project. “Edge of the middle” by Debbie Castro & Kit Ryall Have you ever tried to not look at the middle of a photograph - to ignore the main and intended subject matter and look to the edges – look to the ‘frame’ of the image.   Our eyes are drawn to the centre, an overwhelming desire to create order within the picture we are looking at.  A portrait should be well framed, subject the focus of the photograph, engaging our viewers from the outset.  But have you ever looked to the edges?  If you did you might just discover a little bit about the photographer’s eye and composition intentions or ‘un-intentions’.  This series asks the viewer to look to the edge, outside of the middle of the image; to forget about looking at the obvious subject of the picture and to appreciate how the image was created.  From the very beginning when the photographer looked through the viewfinder - whether in a fast environment or considered, ‘slow-paced’ photography, the photographer made a decision. When they viewed their image afterwards elements became apparent within that picture that they did not consciously see when they ‘framed’ it. 


Here it is. One month to the day. Kit’s and my perspective. Please see websites to see full project.


“Edge of the middle” by Debbie Castro & Kit Ryall


Have you ever tried to not look at the middle of a photograph - to ignore the main and intended subject matter and look to the edges – look to the ‘frame’ of the image.  


Our eyes are drawn to the centre, an overwhelming desire to create order within the picture we are looking at.  A portrait should be well framed, subject the focus of the photograph, engaging our viewers from the outset.  But have you ever looked to the edges?  If you did you might just discover a little bit about the photographer’s eye and composition intentions or ‘un-intentions’. 

This series asks the viewer to look to the edge, outside of the middle of the image; to forget about looking at the obvious subject of the picture and to appreciate how the image was created.  From the very beginning when the photographer looked through the viewfinder - whether in a fast environment or considered, ‘slow-paced’ photography, the photographer made a decision. When they viewed their image afterwards elements became apparent within that picture that they did not consciously see when they ‘framed’ it. 

Source: http://debbiecastro.com